A forum for artists who paint with Water Soluble Oils
 
HomeHome  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Photographing a painting

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Photographing a painting   Sun Nov 29, 2009 3:41 pm

I always have problems with photographing a painting. This time of year when it's really overcast is especially difficult. Any tips on photographing a painting would be appreicated. Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
Callie
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 1233
Join date : 2009-11-21
Location Location : St. Louis, MO USA

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:08 pm

Janet - do you have an image editing program? I usually put my paintings on my porch (north facing and in the shade), then put the camera on a tripod and use a remote switch - no shake, so no blur. Overcast is good - no glare or uneven lighting. I don't bother with any camera settings, I take care of that in Photoshop (white balance, exposure...), then a Levels adjustment to get them looking good for printing or web display.
Usually, if my photos look good in print, they need to be brightened a bit for the web. It helps to keep the painting in view while making adjustments, so you don't over do it!
Someone who actually knows how to use their camera may have some better advice for you
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:20 pm

Callie, I have Gimp, Photoshop, FastStone Image Viewer and a couple of other ones. I'm a collector. lol! Thank you Callie for the great tips! I'll keep trying to tinker with my graphics programs settings and I really need to purchase a tripod. Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
judyfilarecki
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2685
Join date : 2009-11-16
Location Location : Northern NY and Southern Arizona

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:52 pm

I usually turn off the flash on the camera to prevent glare, and face the painting toward a non-sunny window. At night, I put it on my easel and turn on the full spectrum lamp I have attached to the easel. Then I go into photo shop and make lighting adjustments there.

If you look at the three pictures of the Mozart painting,
http://watersolubleoils.forumotion.com/questions-answers-f5/can-you-use-wso-over-a-watercolor-that-has-fixative-on-it-t34.htm
you will see that the first one was adjust in photoshop using the auto adjust. The second, I forgot to adjust it and it was a night shot under the light. The third was a day shot that I adjusted with auto adjust and then went and reduced the brightness manually because the whites were too bright.

Do you have photoshop? If not it is worth getting. It has so many uses, including making composite pictures to experiement with the layout of a painting before you start.

hope that helps.

Judy

_______________________________________________

judy-filarecki.artistwebsites.com***filarecki.com ***judyfilarecki.hubpages.com/
Back to top Go down
dlspinks

avatar

Posts : 42
Join date : 2009-11-23
Location Location : North Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:15 pm

I also use diffuse natural light as much as possible and adjust in Photoshop. Sometimes auto levels overcorrects the contrast or colors, so I usually use the manual levels, where you can fiddle with the histogram. Sometimes just bringing the left and right points in from the sides to the edge of the "mountains" is enough.

You can also adjust an overall yellow or blue cast to the pic using manual levels. The most reliable way is to shoot your pic twice, once with either a white sheet of paper or a photographic midtone greycard covering part of your painting and once without. Don't change your camera settings between shots. In Photoshop levels, there are three eyedroppers in the lower right. If you used a white paper to shoot, use the right (highlight) eyedropper, if you used the greycard, use the middle (midtone) eyedropper and click on the paper/greycard in the pic. Save that profile and use it on the pic without the paper/greycard. Every shooting session will have variation in light from another, so redo the profile for pics taken on another day/time. If you use a true midtone greycard it will be slightly more accurate than using the white paper. But I can't find my greycard from my b/w photo class, so I use the paper one instead .

I also like using the crop tool with perspective. It's great when you've shot work under glass, where you have to tip to the right or left to minimize reflections and glare. And it's great for when you get ref shots where the building is narrower at the top from shooting it at an upward angle or the camera isn't level and the building looks like it is sliding down a hill. It allows you to anchor the four corners along your intended vertical/horizontal lines and pulls the pic into perspective. I almost always get excellent results with this tool.
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Mon Nov 30, 2009 8:35 am

Judy, Thank you for th tips! Yes I do have photoshop. What does a full spectrum lamp do? Smile

Great tips Debra! Thank you! I'm going to need to play around in photoshop more and it's great to be able to narrow it down with you steps. The perspective one is something I run into quite often and I didn't even know that tool existed. Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
judyfilarecki
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2685
Join date : 2009-11-16
Location Location : Northern NY and Southern Arizona

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Mon Nov 30, 2009 11:22 am

Hi Janet,

The full-spectrum lite for artists can be gotten from OTT-lite True color.

It gives more natural lighting for truer color. I even have it in the basement ceiling lights in my matting room in NY making it easier to pick colors for matting my paintings.

The other advantage especially in the winter or if you work indoors all the time is that it gives you body the light it needs to reduce the winter depression (seasonal affect disorder) which many of us northerners experience.

Here's a link to my other website that relates to natural health and talks about full spectrum lighting. (When I'm not painting, I also research natural alternatives)

http://www.natural-plus-healthy.com/full-spectrum-lighting.html

The lighting really helps, both in color choice and in reducing seasonal depression.

Judy

_______________________________________________

judy-filarecki.artistwebsites.com***filarecki.com ***judyfilarecki.hubpages.com/
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Mon Nov 30, 2009 11:51 am

Thank you Judy for explaining the full-spectrum light. I do remember seeing an OTT-lite a Michaels and I'll pick one up next time I'm their. Great information on you web site. Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
judyfilarecki
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2685
Join date : 2009-11-16
Location Location : Northern NY and Southern Arizona

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:11 pm

Be sure you have a coupon because they are expensive at Michaels without one. I have one that attaches to the easel and I'm really happy with it.


Judy

_______________________________________________

judy-filarecki.artistwebsites.com***filarecki.com ***judyfilarecki.hubpages.com/
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Mon Nov 30, 2009 5:21 pm

I did notice the price being pretty steep. I'll make sure to check for a coupon first. I like the idea of clipping it to my easel like yours. Thank you for the pic. Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
acadianartist



Posts : 79
Join date : 2009-11-23
Location Location : Just outside Fredericton, New Brunswick

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sat Dec 05, 2009 6:24 pm

I also photograph indoors, using several light sources and full-spectrum bulbs - much cheaper than those lights from Micheal's. I have 3 bulbs in overhead track lights which I can adjust as needed, then two lamps at 45 degree angles on either side of the painting. The quality of the light is so good, I sometimes turn one of the overhead bulbs away from the painting, because once I bring the painting into normal household light, it appears dull. Perfect for photographing paintings though. I use a tripod, use the landscape setting (no flash) and delay the shutter using the camera's timer to eliminate any shaking resulting from pressing down on the button. And then of course I fine-tune it with my digital image software.
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sat Dec 05, 2009 9:29 pm

Chantal, Than you for sharing your tips on photographing indoors! Rite now we have snow on the ground so I would be photographing mainly indoors. Full-spectrum bulbs that sounds interesting. Where can you purchase them? Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
Callie
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 1233
Join date : 2009-11-21
Location Location : St. Louis, MO USA

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Dec 06, 2009 1:59 am

I get full-spectrum bulbs at the hardware store (Home Depot, Lowes), I don't know what you have in Canada, but stores like Walmart usually have them too.
I found an Ott light at Office Depot on sale (table-top rather than for an easel), it can be adjusted to different angles.
I've got some of those cheap pole lamps - the ones that have 3 lights that can be turned to different directions - those work great with the full-spectrum bulbs.
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Dec 06, 2009 9:33 am

Thank you Callie for the information! We do have a Home Depot and I'll check the local office supply store to see if they have the Ott lights. The pole lamp sounds like a good idea. I'll look for one of those as well.Smile

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:19 pm

Are daylight bulbs similar to full-spectrum bulbs? When I was in the art store in Barrie they had several lights with daylight bulbs.

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
judyfilarecki
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2685
Join date : 2009-11-16
Location Location : Northern NY and Southern Arizona

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:38 pm

I have used the day light bulbs or something similar for the light tubes I used for basement ceiling fluorescent lights. Home Depot and Loews have several different ones. Look for the ones that say they are the closest to natural sun light. Sometimes the green house or plant lights are really good, but they are more expensive.

Judy

_______________________________________________

judy-filarecki.artistwebsites.com***filarecki.com ***judyfilarecki.hubpages.com/
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sat Dec 12, 2009 9:10 am

Thank you Judy for the confirmation. If I can find the full spectrum bulbs I'll buy those but if I can't I'll go with the daylight bulbs.

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
Linus



Posts : 131
Join date : 2010-02-01

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Fri Jun 11, 2010 9:37 pm

I guess this is an old topic but you can find some good advice by googling " how to photograph your art work " or some similar phrase. I have a good piece saved but it was too big to paste.

I am having trouble with image distortation using an Olympus D-540 Zoom. Has anyone run into similar problems?
Back to top Go down
Janet
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2050
Join date : 2009-11-15
Location Location : North Bay, Ontario Canada

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Jun 13, 2010 5:58 pm

Thank you Linus for the tip!

I was getting image distortion as well but I discovered that it was do to my painting being on an angle. I find you need to photograph your painting straight on or it will cause distortion.

_______________________________________________
Janet
http://janet-coloredpencil.blogspot.com/
Back to top Go down
judyfilarecki
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 2685
Join date : 2009-11-16
Location Location : Northern NY and Southern Arizona

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:11 pm

The little bit of distortion you get once you photographic straight on is mainly around the edges. I usually just crop the photo to get rid of any unwanted background, and the distortion goes a way with the crop.

judy

_______________________________________________

judy-filarecki.artistwebsites.com***filarecki.com ***judyfilarecki.hubpages.com/
Back to top Go down
kopo

avatar

Posts : 395
Join date : 2009-11-29
Location Location : Cromer, Norfolk, England

PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:11 pm

Another alternative to cropping is the cloning button
I use it a lot.
Jack
Idea
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Photographing a painting   

Back to top Go down
 
Photographing a painting
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» I'm trying to find a particular painting/artist.
» Chassis painting
» [Ref] Wargames Painting and Modelling: Online Hobby Magazine
» Night Goblins, I never was good at painting greenskins...
» I need some help repairing and painting some wheels

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: Painting Discussions :: Going Digital-
Jump to: